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  1. Playing with Pressure

    In learning about solids, liquids and gases we have focused on how temperature changes cause particles to move more or less (kinetic energy) and may cause changes of state to occur. E.g a liquid evaporating due to heat to form a gas, or a gas cooling and condensing back into a liquid.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 454KB)

  2. Composite Materials

    A composite material is a material made from two or more constituent materials with significantly different physical or chemical properties that, when combined, produce a material with characteristics different from the individual components. The individual components remain separate and distinct within the finished structure. The new material may be preferred for many reasons: common examples include materials which are stronger, lighter, or less expensive when compared to traditional materials.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 6769KB)

  3. Electric Motor

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 298KB)

  4. Evaporation

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 477KB)

  5. Green Gunge

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 242KB)

  6. Stomata

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 938KB)

  7. Water Beads

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 885KB)

  8. Batteries

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 317KB)

  9. Sherbert

    The fizzing on your tongue is caused by a chemical reaction between the citric acid and the sodium bicarbonate. When the citric acid and sodium bicarbonate touch your saliva, they react together to make bubbles that fizz and pop in your mouth. The icing sugar and lollipop make the nice taste.   This reaction is similar to the more common reaction between vinegar and sodium bicarbonate. When an acid (like vinegar or citric acid) is mixed with a carbonate (like sodium bicarbonate), they react to form carbon dioxide gas, water and a salt. The carbon dioxide produced in this reaction is what makes the bubbles on your tongue.  

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 243KB)

  10. Pineapple proteins

    Since pineapple bromelain digests proteins, when the pineapple meets the gelatin, it begins to eat away at it. The long protein chains collapse, making everything watery again.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 389KB)

  11. Baggie Science

    Substances may be created by chemical change and may also undergo chemical change. If a substance is produced as a result of a chemical change, or reaction, it is a product. If a substance is the subject of a chemical change, it is a reactant. The same substance can be either a reactant or a product, depending on the chemical reaction. One way of knowing that a chemical change has occurred is by observing that the properties of the product are different from those of the beginning reactant. There are 4 simple ways the students can recognise a chemical reaction has occurred.   In this experiment two different white powders and a green liquid are added to a bag and the bag is sealed. The mixture changes from green to yellow, one powder cools the liquid as it dissolves, the other powder warms the liquid, bubbles are produced and the bag pressurizes. 

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 647KB)

  12. Thermodynamics Think-In

    Full reference: Read,J. R.  & Kable,S. H. (2007). Educational analysis of the first year chemistry experiment ‘Thermodynamics Think-In’: an ACELL experiment,Chemistry Education,Research & Practice,8(2),255-273.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 404KB)

  13. Determination of silver by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry: An APCELL experiment

    Full Reference:  Wajrak,M.,& Rummey,J. (2004). Determination of silver by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry: An APCELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 63, 26-30.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 119KB)

  14. The determination of the best separation conditions for a mixture of preservatives of varying polarity using HPLC: An APCELL experiment

    Note:  Although the article for download describes this as an ACELL experiment,it was submitted to,and tested at,an APCELL workshop,and as a consequence follows the standard format and documentation associated with APCELL experiments.Full Reference:  Wajrak,M.,& Boyce,M. (2005). The determination of the best separation conditions for a mixture of preservatives of varying polarity using HPLC: An ACELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry,65, 20-23 and 31.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 247KB)

  15. The Determination of the Dissociation Constant of a Weak Acid by Titration: An APCELL Experiment

    Full Reference:  O'Grady,B. (2001). The Determination of the Dissociation Constant 'of a Weak Acid by Titration: An APCELL Experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry,57, 13-17.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 61KB)

  16. Electronic Spectra of Benzene: An APCELL Experiment

    Full Reference:  Shapter,J.,& Gascooke,J. (2003). Electronic Spectra of Benzene: An APCELL Experiment. 'Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 61, 26-29. 

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 144KB)

  17. The emission spectroscopy of C2 produced in a hydrocarbon / oxygen flame: An APCELL experiment

    Full Reference:  Buntine,M. A.,Kable,S. H.,& Metha,G. F. (2004). The emission spectroscopy of C2 produced in a hydrocarbon/oxygen flame: An APCELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry,63, 21-25.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 128KB)

  18. Group Theory and the Near-ultraviolet Absorption Spectrum of Gas-phase Benzene: An APCELL Experiment

    Full Reference:  Williamson,B. E.,& Taylor,K. C. L. (2002). Group Theory and the Near-ultraviolet Absorption Spectrum of Gas-phase Benzene: An APCELL Experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 58, 13-20.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 215KB)

  19. The identification of drugs by infrared and Raman spectroscopy: An APCELL experiment

    Full Reference:  McNaughton,D. (2002). The identification of drugs by infrared and Raman 'spectroscopy: An APCELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry,60, 5-8.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 113KB)

  20. Inhibition of the reaction kinetics of the enzyme o-diphenol oxidase: An APCELL experiment

    Full Reference:  Lim,K. F. (2002). Inhibition of the reaction kinetics of the enzyme o-diphenol oxidase: An APCELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 59, 11-16.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 206KB)

  21. An IR investigation of the CO dipole direction and other properties: An APCELL experiment

    Full Reference:  Lim,K. F. (2004). An IR investigation of the CO dipole direction and other 'properties: An APCELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 64, 24-28.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 139KB)

  22. Laser-based liquid prism sucrosemeter: An APCELL experiment

    Full Reference:  Barnett,V. (2002). Laser-based liquid prism sucrosemeter: An APCELL experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 59, 5-10.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 188KB)

  23. Reactions in non-ideal solution - The effect of ionic strength on the rate of reactions between ions in aqueous solution (the kinetic salt effect): An APCELL Experiment

    Full 'Reference:  Barnett,V. G. (2003). Reactions in non-ideal solution - The effect of ionic strength on the rate of reactions between ions in aqueous solution (the kinetic salt effect): An APCELL Experiment. Australian Journal of Education in Chemistry, 62, 5-8 and 20.

    Download Published Experiment (Acrobat PDF, 131KB)